Hi6942O

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 #1
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I can answer problem 2!

 

This problem can be solved by analyzing the behavior of the function f(x, y) at different points and identifying repeating patterns.

 

Understanding the Function:

 

The function f(x, y) modifies the x and y coordinates based on the initial values of x and y.

 

If x > 4, it subtracts 4 from x and keeps y the same. (e.g., f(5, 1) = (1, 1))

 

If x <= 4 and y > 4, it keeps x the same and subtracts 4 from y. (e.g., f(2, 5) = (2, 1))

 

Otherwise (x <= 4 and y <= 4), it adds 5 to x and adds 2 to y. (e.g., f(1, 1) = (6, 3))

 

Analyzing the Robot's Movement:

 

Starting Point: The robot starts at (1, 1).

 

First Iteration: Applying f(1, 1) based on the third rule (x <= 4 and y <= 4), we get f(1, 1) = (6, 3).

 

Subsequent Iterations:

 

At (6, 3), x > 4 and y > 4. So, f(6, 3) = (2, -1). (This is because x is now greater than 4, and y is greater than 4 in the new position).

 

At (2, -1), x <= 4 and y <= 4. So, f(2, -1) = (7, 1).

 

At (7, 1), x > 4 and y <= 4. So, f(7, 1) = (3, 1).

 

Repeating Pattern:

 

Notice how the robot's movement falls into a repeating cycle: (1, 1) -> (6, 3) -> (2, -1) -> (7, 1) -> (3, 1) -> (8, 3) -> ...

 

This cycle repeats because after reaching (3, 1), the function follows the same path back to (1, 1) and continues the cycle infinitely.

 

Number of Unique Points:

 

Within this cycle, there are 4 unique points visited: (1, 1), (6, 3), (2, -1), and (7, 1).

 

Therefore, the robot will visit only 4 unique points regardless of how long it runs.

25 may 2024